Employment

Employment hand shakeIt can take time but many ex-offenders get and keep good jobs. Everyone searching for work will get some knockbacks. The education and training that you have undertaken in prison are relevant certificates that can go into your Curriculum Vitae (CV) that do not specifically show that you did this training in prison.

A Police record can be a barrier to employment – learn more on how to disclose your conviction.

Services Australia – Centrelink JobActive
Telephone: 13 62 68
Job Seeker Hotline
https://jobsearch.gov.au/

No cost service that helps both employers and employees. Links to training, practical help for finding a job, tips on resume and cover letter writing.

Never miss a job opportunity with the jobactive Job Seeker app. Download from Google Play or Apple iTunes.

Google Play button Download our app from Google Play or the Apple App Store Apple iTunes

Department of Education, Skills and Employment – Job Hub
https://www.dese.gov.au/covid-19/jobs-hub

Job-seeking Australians now have a one stop shop for available positions across the country, thanks to the federal government’s new ‘Job Hub’.

A variety of businesses and organisations that are still operating have multiple jobs on offer, in what’s being described as a ‘rapidly changing jobs market’.

The federal government has launched an online portal that lists all the job opportunities in one place, making it easier for those looking for work to consider their options.

iWork

Phone: +61 8 9470 1008
Email: job@iworkjobsite.com.au
Website: https://iworkjobsite.com.au/Jobseeker-Home.htm

IWORK is a company that has a specific purpose of assisting the Government in its pursuit to Close the Gap in the Indigenous unemployment area. We do this by putting employers in direct contact with our vast National Indigenous audience

The IWORK Training Opportunities page advertises free and subsidised courses and training opportunities, explicitly for Indigenous job seekers. They wish to up-skill and improve their resumes, which increases their chances of gaining employment outcomes

Ngalla Maya
Phone: +61 8 9478 6000
Email: enquiries@ngallmaya.org.au
50 Belvidere Street, Belmont
Aboriginal training to employment program for ex-offender over 18 years of age who have been released after 22 June 2017.

Service providers
JobActive provides details of Service Providers.

Outcare
Outcare provides multiple programs where clients can get support with training and employment. These include courses for the completion of Cert 1 qualifications, back to work assistance, help writing resumes, support for how to disclose convictions, career support and help finding employment post release.
Telephone: +61 8 6263 8622. 

Ruah Workright
Ruah Workright supports people with mental health disabilities to find employment and access training and/or education services. Operates throughout metropolitan area.
Telephone: 13 78 24

Time to Work Employment Services (Aboriginal Prisoners)
Under the Time to Work Employment Service (TWES), Time to Work Providers (TWP) will register Aboriginal Prisoners before release. Generally speaking, during these meetings, the TWP will:

  • conduct a Job Seeker Classification Instrument assessment
  • assist the Department of Human Services to conduct the Employment Services Assessment
  • discuss and prepare a Participant’s Transition Plan, and
  • organise and attend a Facilitated Transfer Meeting with the Participant and their post-release Employment Services Provider.

For more information contact the Time to Work Employment Service, Telephone: 1800 805 260

Dressed for success
Provides women with professional clothing to present well for interviews to secure employment.
https://perth.dressforsuccess.org
Telephone: +61 8 9382 1003

Internet searches

Most jobs are advertised on the internet.  The popular websites are: 

Google search by industry eg Construction jobs Western Australia.

Small Business Development Corporation
Contact details for Small Businesses Development Corporation.  This state agency provides practical advice and support and fosters development of small businesses. Telephone: +61 8 6552 3300
WA based businesses only telephone: 13 12 49

Department of Business
The federal Department of Business provides information on starting a business, running your business, grants assistance and support available.

Nifnex
Nifnex runs business networking events for small business and entrepreneurship.
Telephone: 1300 643 639

Disability Employment Services (JobAccess)
Australian Government’s JobAccess is an employment service that helps people with disabilities find employment and keep a job. This website has information about employers and service providers.

Wheatbelt Jobs
Phone: +61 428 855 224
Website: https://wheatbeltjobs.com.au/
Job seeking website for the Wheatbelt region, also provides a free resume and advice service.

Jora - Job Search Australia
Job search engine for jobs available throughout Australia
Website: https://au.jora.com

SkillsReady
Phone: +61 8 6551 5000
https://www.jobsandskills.wa.gov.au/skillsready
Post release training opportunities that are available either free or fee capped. Available to prisoners and their family members.

Karratha Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: Karratha TAFE, Dampier Road, Karratha WA 6714
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9168 9488
Email: pilbarajsc@nrtafe.wa.edu.au

Broome Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: Broome TAFE campus, 68 Cable Beach Rd
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9168 9499
Email: kimberleyjsc@nrtafe.wa.edu.au

Kalgoorlie Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: Main administration building, Kalgoorlie TAFE, 34 Cheetham Street Kalgoorlie
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9088 6946
Email: goldfieldsjsc@crtafe.wa.edu.au

Northam Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: LOT 1 Hutt Street Northam Western Australia, 6401
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9622 6860
Email: wheatbeltjsc@crtafe.wa.edu.au

Geraldton Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: X Block, Geraldton TAFE, Fitzgerald Street Geraldton
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9956 2960
Email: midwestjsc@crtafe.wa.edu.au  
If you are located in the Gascoyne region, you may wish to contact us by email at gascoynejsc@crtafe.wa.edu.au

Bunbury Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: Robertson Drive, Bunbury WA 6230
telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9780 7008
Email: bunburyjsc@srtafe.wa.edu.au

Albany Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: L Block, Albany TAFE campus, 5 Anson Rd, Albany WA 6330
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9892 8749
Email: albanyjsc@srtafe.wa.edu.au

Joondalup Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: North Metropolitan TAFE – A block, 35 Kendrew Crescent Joondalup
Telephone: 13 64 64 (or 08 9233 1738)
Email: joondalupjsc@nmtafe.wa.edu.au

Balga Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: North Metropolitan TAFE – F Block, 18 Loxwood Road Balga
Telephone: 13 64 64 (or 08 9207 4388)
Email: balgajsc@nmtafe.wa.edu.au

Northbridge Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: North Metropolitan TAFE - Building 2, 30 Aberdeen St Northbridge
Telephone: 13 64 64 (or 08 9428 0488)
Email: northbridgejsc@nmtafe.wa.edu.au

Thornlie Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: South Metropolitan TAFE – Building 1, Burslem Drive Thornlie
Telephone: 13 64 64 (or 08 9267 7600)
Email: thornliejsc@smtafe.wa.edu.au

Rockingham Jobs and Skills Centre
Address: South Metropolitan TAFE – Building G, Simpson Avenue Rockingham
Telephone: 13 64 64 (or 08 9599 8655)
Email: rockinghamjsc@smtafe.wa.edu.au

Peel (Mandurah)
Address: 2 Education Drive, Greenfields WA 6210
Telephone: 13 64 64 (within WA) or 08 9586 7411
Email: peeljsc@smtafe.wa.edu.au  

Bloodwood Tree is an incorporated Aboriginal organisation offering career guidance, employment skills workshops and training, employment plans and emergency assistance.
Address: 19 Hamilton Road, South HEADLAND WA 6722.
Telephone: +61 8 9138 3000

Southern Aboriginal Corporation
Southern Aboriginal Corporation supports Aboriginal people to obtain meaningful and sustainable employment within the Great Southern Region.
Address: 45-47 Serpentine Road, ALBANY WA 6330.
Telephone: +61 8 9842 7777

Casual work

You may not have regular shifts or guaranteed hours. It is usually the easiest type of work. Get a higher rate of pay because you don’t get sick pay or annual leave.

You can find this type of work by searching ‘casual jobs’, on Google, Gumtree or job sites such as Seek, Careerone and Airtasker

Trials

An unpaid Trial can lead to paid work but it often doesn’t.

If a trial is for more than one shift you should be paid.

These jobs are sometimes available by cold calling (going to the business and asking for any work available), advertised in the window of the business or on websites like Gumtree.

If you have questions or concerns about any practice at your workplace have a look at the Fairwork website – link below

Fair Work Online
Fair Work Online provides information about

  • how much you should be paid
  • how to deal with a problem with your employer
  • the minimum conditions you are entitled to
  • what you can do if you have lost your job
  • what legislation you are covered by

Have all the information you need with you if calling so you can provide all the information they will need to assist you.
Telephone: 13 13 94 – (8.00 am - 5.30 pm Monday – Friday)

Employment Law Centre of WA (Inc)
Employment Law Centre of WA provides free, confidential legal advice on employment matters to vulnerable Western Australian employees.
Telephone: 1300 130 656
Telephone: +61 8 9227 0111

A Police record can be a barrier to employment.

Convictions are never wiped. However after 10 years most convictions may be spent. This means that they do not appear on a Police Certificate. The person is legally allowed to say, “I have no convictions”, and it is an offence for an employer to take spent convictions into account.

  • Applications to have convictions spent can be made at any Police Station. When a conviction is spentin almost all cases, it no longer exists for the purposes of employment. Do not disclose spent convictions.
  • If you are not asked about offences you do not have to volunteer the information.
  • If you are asked a direct question about offences, (application forms, interviews etc) and you lie, you may be dismissed later for knowingly providing incorrect information. For dismissal to occur, the false information must be significant.

Do you have to tell an employer about your record?

  • If you are not asked about offences you do not have to volunteer the information.
  • If you are asked a direct question about offences, (application forms, interviews etc) and you lie, you may be dismissed later for knowingly providing incorrect information. For dismissal to occur, the false information must be significant.

If you tell an employer about your record

If an employer knows about you past and you get the job, you do not have to worry about your convictions being discovered later. Chance meetings, investigations after thefts or similar incidents may lead to your past being discovered. Remember: Western Australia can be a small place!

It is also clear that many people who do disclose their convictions to employers, do not get the job. Often they don’t know if it was because of the convictions or not.

The decision is yours.

For short term or casual jobs (eg: labourer, relief store man, and fruit picker) it is normally not necessary to disclose, unless asked.

It is advisable to disclose in cases which the job you are applying for is likely to be permanent – especially where trust and/or responsibility is involved.

Most people who are serious about starting over, don’t want to live with the fear that their past will catch up with them.

What the employer really wants to know

Employers usually look for people who can do the job

Employers usually look for people who will do the job

Employers usually look for people who will fit in

The employer does not want to hire a problem.

Disclosing – How to do it

Application forms often have questions like:

“Have you been convicted of any offence in any court in WA? If Yes, give details”

If you are confident that your offences are minor, and not relevant to the job, write the details of adult convictions. Eg: 1989, Possession of cannabis – Good behaviour bond.

However, in most cases a brief description looks bad.

Try writing one of these:

  • I have offences which are minor, not relevant to this position and occurred a long time ago. I’m happy to provide full details at an interview.
  • I have an offence which is not relevant to this position. I am happy to provide full details at an interview.
  • I have an offence which I don’t believe affects my suitability for this position. I am happy to provide full details at an interview.

Everyone’s story will be different however a good explanation usually fits the following pattern:

  • If possible, say that the offences are not relevant to the job
  • Summarise the offences – don’t give lots of detail
  • Indicate the circumstances – alcohol, breakdown of marriage, gambling, drug habit……
  • Take responsibility
  • Show how your circumstances have changed
  • Talk about these things happening in the past

Remind the employer again about your skills and abilities and willingness to get on with life.


Last updated: 10-Mar-2021

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